COVID-19 Surface Swab Testing

COVID-19 Surface Swab Testing

Per the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), spreads via respiratory droplets from person-to-person in close contact. 1 However, evidence has shown that SARS-CoV-2 can remain viable in various surfaces from hours to days. 2 In our current environment, people may become ill if they touch a COVID-19 contaminated surface and then touch their eyes, nose, or mouth.In an effort to control spread of disease, building owners are being advised to disinfect commonly touched surfaces on a daily or even more frequent basis. 

One way to validate the success of the surface disinfection is to perform a surface swab analysis. Sampling sites are based on current understanding of high-touch surfaces including but not limited to doorknobs, light switches, keyboards, faucet and shower handles, hand soap dispensers, table and counter surfaces, and elevator buttons. Ensuring proper disinfection of these surfaces will lead to decreased COVID-19 transmission routes.

Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Hotels, Universities, Healthcare Facilities, and Office Buildings are just some types of buildings that at high occupancy have a number of high-touch surfaces. Barclay Water Management, Inc. is able to process surface swab samples and provide a result of “detected” or “non-detected” for the SARS-COV-2 (COVID-19) virus using PCR technology.

Please contact Barclay Water Management, Inc. for more information on COVID-19 Surface Swab Testing.

 

1. “Interim Recommendations for US Community Facilities with Suspected/Confirmed Coronavirus Disease 2019.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 Apr. 2020, www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/organizations/cleaning-disinfection.html.

2. Doremalen, Neeltje Van, et al. “Aerosol and Surface Stability of SARS-CoV-2 as Compared with SARS-CoV-1.” New England Journal of Medicine, 2020, doi:10.1056/nejmc2004973.

 


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